The Boxer dog- Child friend and loyal watchdog

Often seen as incredibly macho, in the past Boxers were seen as bad-tempered with a drooling bite. However, in recent years people have come to realise that this is completely wrong and they are now being valued for their actual qualities. As a friendly, easy-going family dog with a special connection to children. If you are looking for a pedigree dog that is going to walk in and become a member of your family instantly, while looking after your children then the boxer dog is the perfect candidate for this.

From hunting dog to family favourite

Ancestors of the German boxers were the Brabant Bullbeißer, which was very popular at aristocratic farms and were mainly used for wild boar hunting. The advantage of these strong dogs was that they could hold game with their strong teeth until the hunter was on the spot. Bulldogs were later crossed in and the new breeding line was officially called Boxer, based on the name "Bierboxer" used in Munich. The first public presentation of the Boxer breed took place in 1885 and in 1924 it was approved as a working dog in the emergency and police service as well as a guide dog for the blind. For a long time, tail and ear cropping was common in the breeding of the Boxer. Fortunately, this intervention is prohibited today.

Temperament and character of the Boxer

The Boxer is a confident dog with healthy self-confidence. Their temperament is cheerful, bright and active, a dog that absolutely must have an abundance of exercise and outdoor activity. Family and known friends will be truly loved by the Boxer, however, at first they may remain rather sceptical of strangers and can have a tendency to be quite stubborn. Don’t panic though, however, as, if loved this can all be counteracted. In dangerous situations, Boxers show their protective qualities and defend their loved ones and the area with fervour. Boxers also tend to dominate towards other dogs, if there is insufficient stimulation, boxers tend to be nervous and hyperactive.

Education and attitude of the Boxer

Like every dog, the boxer should learn safe, basic, obedient and basic commands. Since the intelligent Boxer likes to have their person's attention, it is relatively easy to train them. The prerequisite for this is that they accept their owner as a pack leader. The Boxer benefits from their relationship in households with children. So that these positive aspects also come into their own with your dog, good posture, as well as a lot of exercise is necessary for the education of the Boxer. They are an ideal family dog but also works as a working dog - for example as a rescue and companion dog or in protection and guard service. Treat your boxer to at least an hour and a half of exercise in the form of walks or as a companion on a bike or while riding. Fit and agile as they are, they love sports and games where they can let off steam. The lively boxer is only of limited use if kept in the big city, however, if they must be, then make sure they have a large garden to roam and guard.

Caring for the Boxer

Grooming is simple, brushing occasionally with a soft harrow is sufficient. Due to their thin fur, the animals are somewhat sensitive to the cold, so make sure you Boxer does not get cold. A breed-typical susceptibility to disease exists for a deformation of the eyelids (entropion).

Profile-

  • Breed: Boxer
  • Origin: Germany
  • Classification: Pinscher. Schnauzer, molossoids, mastiff-like-dogs
  • Size: Male 56-63cm shoulder height. Female 53-59cm shoulder height.
  • Weight: Male 30-34kg. Female 23-27kg
  • Body: Slim waist, medium sized, compact-muscular, short straight back, slim rising tail
  • Eyes: Dark eyes, coloured eyelid rims
  • Ears: Attached lop ears
  • Fur and colour: Short haired and smooth; yellow to brown or tabby fur with black mask and badge (black or spotted fur is undesirable)
  • Special feature: Strong bite and sensitive to the cold
  • Character: Spirited, confident, strong nerves, child friendly
  • Maintenance: Brush regularly